Library

Publishing is a core part of the CAU's mission—sharing results from our excavations for use by archaeologists, students, planners and the general public. 

 

Other thirty years, the CAU has published twenty monographs along with over 130 articles in academic journals. Many are now available to download for free. 

Our collection of nearly 1,500 'grey literature' reports is being progressively uploaded. The first 500 can be searched below or using the map to the right. These reports can all be downloaded for free. 

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1000

Trinity College Kitchens, Cambridge

Newman, R. (2011), Trinity College Kitchens, Cambridge: An Archaeological Excavation and Watching Brief. Cambridge Archaeological Unit Report No. 1000

1000

Archaeological investigations were recently undertaken in two discrete areas located within the grounds of Trinity College, Cambridge, in advance of the redevelopment of the College's kitchen facilities. The first, and most intensively excavated, of the two areas was situated within the present kitchen cellar, beneath the southern end of the Great Hall. Here, four phases of activity were identified in three distinct trenches. The first of these phases consisted of a series of pits of 12th to 16th century date. Subsequently, the majority of these features were truncated by the erection of two substantial structures, both of which contained undercrofts. These buildings were associated with the newly established Trinity College, which had been founded at the site by Henry VIII in 1546. The third phase of activity, which occurred in 1603-04, consisted of the demolition of the two preceding structures. These were then replaced during phase four by the College's extant Great Hall, which was completed in 1605. The second area of investigation was situated around 70m to the southwest of the first, inside the southeastern corner of the southern range of New Court. Here, a single trench was excavated in advance of the construction of an electrical switchroom. The earliest activity to be identified in this location consisted of a sub-soil deposit, containing Roman pottery, which was then overlain by a series of alluvial layers. These were then truncated by a series of features during the 11th/12th centuries. Then, in the early 13th century, three closely adjacent timber buildings were constructed. In the early 14th century, however, all three buildings were demolished and the area was transformed into a long-lived garden. The site remained in use as a garden until a stable block was constructed in the late 17th century. Then, in 1823, the stables were demolished in order to make way for the construction of New Court.

1001

Cantelupe Solar Farm, Haslingfield

Tabor, J.L (2011), Archaeological Filed Survey and Aerial Photographic Assessment at Cantelupe Solar Farm, Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire. Cambridge Archaeological Unit Report No. 1001

1001

Archaeological field survey comprising fieldwalking and metal detecting was undertaken by Cambridge Archaeological Unit (CAU) at Cantelupe Farm, to the north-east of Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire (centred on TL 414 537). The fieldwork was supplemented by an aerial photographic survey undertaken by Air Photo Services. The work was undertaken on behalf of Terence O'Rourke Ltd. for Alectron Solar Ltd., as part of a planning application submission for the construction of a solar farm. The aerial photographic survey identified no archaeological sites or features within the proposed development area whilst fieldwalking and metal detecting yielded comparatively few finds, the majority of which were post-medieval in date. The finds were spread widely across the two fields surveyed and the assemblage is considered to be consistent with 'background levels' of artefacts which would be expected in most agricultural fields.

1002

Glebe Farm, Cambridge: An Archaeological Excavation

Collins, M. (2011), Glebe Farm, Cambridge An Archaeological Excavation . CAU Report Number 1002

1002

Cambridge Archaeological Unit undertook the excavation of two adjacent areas at Glebe Farm, Cambridge, between 15th June to 3rd August, and, 18th October to 21st October 2010. These excavations revealed a dispersed scatter of features including a small group of Early Neolithic pits, post-holes and utilised treethrows, Early and Middle Iron Age pits, and a continuation of a previously identified Early-Middle Iron Age boundary ditch system. Also present were an undated ring-gully with a central inhumation, and a further, smaller, undated ring-gully with a central post-hole.

1004

Neath Farm, Buissness Park, Cherry Hinton,

Slater, A. (2011), Neath Farm Buissness Park, Cherry Hinton, Cambridge. Archaeological Evaluation.. Cambridge Archaeological Unit Report No. 1004

1004

Between the 19th and 21st of April 2011, Cambridge Archaeological Unit undertook a small evaluation by trial trench within the easternmost extent of Neath Farm Business Park, Cherry Hinton; immediately adjacent to Church End Road. A densely packed sequence of linear ditches and gullies of 12-14th century date was identified as well as several discrete features and pits. The evaluation was undertaken on behalf of Ventress Property Developments Ltd.

1006

Ash Court, Girton College, Cambridge

NEwman, R., Ferraby, R. and Hutton, J. (2011), Ash Court, Girton College, Cambridge: an Archaeological Evaluation. Cambridge Archaeological Unit CAU Report Number 1006

1006

Three phases of archaeological investigation were undertaken at Ash Court, Girton College, Cambridge, between the 21st of February and the 11th of March 2011. In the first instance, a geophysical survey of the area was undertaken. Subsequently, the excavation of a series of five geotechnical test pits was monitored before, thirdly, four evaluation trenches were inserted at the site. The earliest features to be encountered during these works consisted of a series of tree-boles/tree-throws that showed no signs of anthropogenic involvement in their creation. These had been overlain by a horizon of well-worked horticultural soil. As this latter deposit showed no evidence of bioturbation, it appears likely that the area was cleared prior to the commencement of agricultural activity. Overlying the horticultural soil was a compacted spread of ash and charcoal that was deposited in the late 19th century, during the early years of Girton College. Also dating to this period was a large gravel quarry pit, which appears to have been associated with the initial construction of Old Wing in the early 1870s. Finally, evidence of 20th century landscaping activity - in the form of a rubble spread, and an upcast gravel bank flanking Orchard Drive - was also encountered. These results clearly demonstrate that the large Anglo-Saxon cemetery that was previously identified a little way to the south during the late 19th century does not extend into the proposed development area.

1007

Moat Farm, Kingston, Cambridgeshire

James, L. (2011), An Archaeological Investigation At Moat House, Kingston, Cambridgeshire. Cambridge Archaeological Unit Report No. 1007

1007

An Archaeological watching brief was undertaken on the 19th April 2011 at Moat House in Kingston, Cambridgeshire (TL44035342) in an area enclosed by a moat which was first recorded in 1212. No archaeological features were recorded within the 8 test pits excavated around the proposed development area.

1011

Must Farm, Whittlesey 2010, Phase 4 Archaeological Investigations

Murrell, K. (2011), Must Farm, Whittlesey 2010, Phase 4 Archaeological Investigations; Interim Statement. Cambridge Archaeological Unit CAU Report Number 1011

1011

A programme of archaeological excavation and recording prior to mineral extraction was undertaken within phase 4 of Must Farm quarry between September 2010 and April 2011, on behalf of Hanson UK. A total of 4.344 hectares were machined stripped under controlled archaeological conditions to expose the expected bank and ditch and potential features associated with the earlier unaltered buried soil deposits. The investigation produced a large quantity of surface artefacts, predominantly lithic, which often co-insided with darker charcoal enriched areas of buried soil and in some cases artefact rich spreads. These spreads were more typical of midden deposits, yielding either Beaker or Collared/ EBA Urn pottery, always independent of each other. An abundance of cattle and deer tracks were identified across site 4, in places these were very dense, trample zones, but overall appeared to converge towards the north-west corner. Numerous hearths were identified across the entirety of site 4, the majority of which were associated with multiple stakeholes either around their edges or in some cases within. Few large pit/ wells were present, all of which contained well preserved waterlogged wood. The Middle Bronze Age bank and ditch, which was constructed after the initial formation of peat, stretched the entire length of the stripped area from south to north, meandering gently in places but bending sharply in others. The ditch itself was a series of smaller joined segments which created one continuous up-cast bank with no breaks or gaps along its length unlike phase 3 where it was segmented. A number of the earlier trackways and dark spreads could be seen on both sides of the bank and ditch and once removed continued underneath giving a true sense of depth and preservation to the features beneath.

1012

The Rectory, Barton Bendish, Norfolk; An Archaeological Evaluation

Slater, A (2011), The Rectory, Barton Bendish, An Archaeological Evaluation. Cambridge Archaeological Unit Cambridge Archaeological Unit Report No. 1012

1012

Between the 9th and 14th of May 2011, Cambridge Archaeological Unit (CAU) undertok a small evaluation within the gardens surrounding The Rectory, Barton Bendish, Norfolk. A series of Saxo-Norman linear ditches and gullies were found as well as discrete and undated features.

1014

Land at Cuckoo Hill Farm, Cottenham, Cambridgeshire; An Archaeological Evaluation

Slater, A (2011), Land at Cuckoo Hill Farm, Cottenham, Cambridgeshire; An Archaeological Evaluation. Cambridge Archaeological Unit Cambridge Archaeological Unit Report no. 1014

1014

Cambridge archaeological Unit undertook an archaeological evaluation on land at Cuckoo Hill Farm on the 13th June 2011. Three trenches, a total of 100m in length were excavated. A single pit and posthole were exposed.

1019

Land North of Upton South Broiler Farm, Upton wth Fishley, Norfolk

Slater, A (2011), Land North of Upton South Broiler Farm, Upton with Fishley, Norfolk. Cambridge Archaeological Unit CAU report no. 1019

1019

Cambridge Archaeological Unit (CAU) undertook an archaeological evaluation on land at Upton with Fishley, Norfolk between the 20th and 22nd of June 2011. Four trench, totalling 120m were excavated and evidence of Medieval and post-Medieval quarrying as well as an undated ditch and a post Medieval boundary ditch were found.

1020

Land adjacent to 17 Orwell Road, Barrington, Cambs. An Archaeological Evaluation

Tabor, J.L. (2011), Land adjacent to 17 Orwell Road, Barrington, Cambridgeshire. An Archaeological Evaluation. Cambridge Archaeological Unit Report No. 1020

1020

A trial trench based archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Cambridge Archaeological Unit (CAU) on land adjacent to 17 Orwell Road, Barrington, Cambridgeshire (TL 387 496). The proposed development area (PDA) comprises a 0.07 ha plot to the west of Orwell Road. Three trenches, positioned according to the proposed locations of a house and garage, revealed a total of four archaeological features; two ditches and two pits. Pottery recovered from two of these features suggests activity dating to the 14th-15th century. The archaeological features, though few in number, provide a useful insight into medieval Barrington and are an important addition to the local archaeological record. The limited finds assemblage suggests the site is not associated with domestic activity and it seems likely that it was located on the periphery of the medieval settlement.

1021

Plots 3and 20, Eagle Business Park, Yaxley, Cambridgeshire: An archaeological evaluation

Zeki, L (2011), Plots 3 and 20 at Eagle Business Park, Yaxley, Cambridgeshire, An Archaeological Evaluation. CAU Report number 1021

1021

An archaeological evaluation was undertaken to address a condition placed upon planning consent by Cambridgeshire Archaeology Planning Countryside Advice (CAPCA). The Proposed Development Area (PDA) is on Plots 3 and 20 at Eagle Business Park situated south east of Broadway in Yaxley, Cambridgeshire (NGR TL 1974 9356). Six trenches, totalling 343m² were excavated. No archaeological features were discovered. Several modern drainage features were revealed.